gippsland

Tarra Bulga National Park climb

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Distance:  16.6 km
Average Gradient:  4%
Elevation gained:  585 meters
Category:  2
Surface: Sealed
Traffic: Light

Click here for the link to the Strava segment.

The Tarra Bulga National Park is a 1,522 hectare national park situated in the eastern part of the Strzelecki Ranges. The area was named after “Charlie Tarra” who was an Aborine guide who led Count Strezelecki and his party through Gippsland when they discovered the area in 1840.  The National Park itself was originally given the Aborininal name “Bulga”, which means “Mountain”.  It is very popular with hikers and those that love the feel of a rainforest. The cool moist conditions provide the perfect environment for a rain forest. The park is well known for its giant Mountain Ash trees and lush fern gullies and ancient myrtle beeches.

Tarra Bulga National Park climb

The Tarra Valley roads is quite narrow windy road with a number of blind corners. There are no line markings on the road and cars tend to drive in the middle of the road so keep an ear out and keep as far to the left as possible when a vehicle approaches. The road is covered in a rainforest canopy and to either side of the road are lush fern gullies, and tall giant trees.  Due to the road rarely seeing any sunlight, it is common for the road to be wet in sections.

The road follows the Tarra River, with the road running parallel to this river on the lower slopes.  There are four bridge road crossings over the Tarra River.  All are wooden bridges, which have gaps which will swallow your tires.  The safest way to cross a wooden bridge to avoid the cracks is to ride diagonally over it, however these bridges are often wet.  They can be quite slippery to ride across and dangerous even when dry.  It is highly recommended that you disembark and walk across these bridges.

The climb finishes in the town of Balook.

This is one of the most stunning climbs you will find in the state of Victoria, and one you should add to your bucket list.  There are several tourist spots on the climb which are worth stopping off for. The Tarra Valley Picnic grounds (pictured below) is a magical place to visit and offers some amazing hikes.  Nearby are the Tarra falls, which are only a very short walk from the road down some stairs to view the falls (take care on the steps in the wet).

Just make sure to get a photo or three.

Over on the far side of the climb to the north is Mount Tassie.  This offers some truly spectacular views of Gippsland from up top.

Heads up

  • Narrow windy roads with a number of blind corners
  • A number of undulation changes through the climb with several steep sections along the way
  • The National Park is home to a large number of wildlife
  • Bring adequate supplies as shops may not be open
  • This area receives a very high level of rainfall each year and temperatures are much colder than surrounding areas. Make sure you plan your ride
  • During summer this is a bushfire area
  • Dangerous descent

Grand Ridge Road

Tarra Valley Road joins onto Grand Ridge Road.  This is one of Victoria’s most spectacular tourist roads which follows the ridge of the Strzelecki Ranges and is a gravel road which is 135 km in length from Seaview to Carrajung.  If you’re in the area its a  bucket list ride.

How to get there

Tarra-Bulga National Park is situated approximately 190 kilometres east of Melbourne.  Take Princes Highway to Traralgon, then follow Traralgon Creek Road to Balook. The park can also be reached from Yarram via the Tarra Valley Road or Bulga Park Road.

During fire season

Tarra Bulga National Park is in a fire district. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at www.cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.

Further information for the Tarra Bulga National Park (on Parks Victoria website)

The descent

Use extreme caution when descending Tarra Valley Road.  It is a very narrow road, which is often slippery due to the damp rainforest air.  There is poor visibility around corners and if a vehicle was coming the other way you will not see them until the last possible second.  You may encounter a significant amount of tree debris lying across the road, and the area is also home to an abundance of wildlife, which you will not want to see on your descent.

Bulga Park Road climb (Tarra Valley)

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Distance: 12.3 km
Average Gradient: 4.1%
Elevation Gained: 517 meters
Surface: Gravel
Traffic: Non-existent
Category: 1

Click here for the link to the Strava segment.

Bulga Park Road takes you through the majestic Tarra Bulga National Park, which show cases some of the states best rainforest. ‘Bulga’ is an Aboriginal word, meaning ‘high place’ or ‘mountain’ and the word ‘Tarra’ comes from Strzelecki Ranges Aboriginal guide, Charlie Tarra.  The park is part of the Strzelecki Ranges which stretches across Gippsland for roughly 100 km. These ranges were named after the Polish explorer, Paul Strzelecki, who in 1840.  After climbing and naming Mount Kosciusko, Strzelecki set off to Gippsland to explore the ranges.  His party entered the north-eastern end of the ranges and struggled through the rugged country for 22 days. Finally emerging starved and exhausted at Western Port Bay.

The climb commences at the junction of Bulga Park Road & Baxters Road (in front of the State School Reserve) in Macks Creek.

This is a climb of two parts with two short flattened out sections which spans Macks Creek (which unfortunately you can’t see from the climb).  The first 6 km has a soft sandy surface which may not offer the greatest of traction depending on weather conditions.  This first part takes you through a dense forest which has several sections which open off whcih offer amazing views of the valley to the right of the climb.  There is a mixture of long dead straights with switchbacks to mix up the climb.  For the majority the surface is dirt, however there are a few short rocky sections which are challenging to find a smooth riding line through.

The second part of the climb takes you through the Tarra Bulga National Park which will take you on a journey through an ancient forest of Mountain ash, Sassafras, Myrtle Beech, Silver Wattle and Blackwood. These trees create a canopy that reaches as high as 60 meters. This can filter out as much as 95 percent of the light. The area has 33 different species of ferns, some growing as high as ten meters which are just incredible to see.

The road surface in the National Park is different.  This surface consists of hard packed dirt and rounded rocks which are a low risk for punctures.  This section of the climb offers much better traction, and has lots of sweeping bends which makes it much easier to break up your climb. Plus is alot easier on the eye.

Bulga Park Road climb

This is a climb with a nice easy gradient, which will suit riders of all abilities, and an adventure down one of the roads less travelled, and a worthy addition to anyone’s bucket list.

The climb finishes at the town of Balook

Bulga Park Road climb at a glance

  • Long undulating climb
  • Breathtaking scenery
  • The area is a naturally damp rainforest and can experience tree debris lying across the road.  Expect damp, cold conditions
  • Heavy canopy which leads to poor drainage of the road (expect anything on this climb)
  • The National Park is home to a large number of wildlife
  • Toilet facilities available in Balook
  • Limited places to purchase food in this area; Café in Balook (limited opening times) & at the Tarra Valley Caravan Park (Tarra Valley Road). It is advised to bring adequate supplies with you
  • During summer this is a bushfire area
  • This is a logging area.  If you hear a truck come along it is advised to pull off the road to safely let them pass

About the Tarra Bulga National Park

The Tarra Bulga National Park was created when fifty acres was set aside in 1903.  This was later extended to eighty hectares. A separate 750 acres was reserved in the Tarra Valley in 1909 and the intervening land was purchased later. The Tarra Valley National Park (1230 hectares) was then declared in June, 1986.

During fire season

Tarra-Bulga National Park is in a fire district. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at www.cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.

Further information for the Tarra Bulga National Park (on Parks Victoria website)

Bulga Park Road climb

Cycling Grand Ridge Road

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Images courtesy of Andrew Clifforth photography.

If you’re looking for a grand adventure on the bike.  Grand Ridge Road (GRR) is one of Victoria’s most spectacular tourist drives.  Taking you through the heart of Gippsland.  GRR is mainly unsealed, but well maintained in most areas, and can be ridden on any sort of bike.  The road snakes its way along the ridge of the Strzelecki Ranges.  Covering 135km from Seaview to Carrajung.  This road provides stunning views through the La Trobe Valley, and to Bass Coast and Wilsons Prom to the south.

 

It is an incredible road to cycle because of the ever-changing scenery.  From fern forests to rolling pastures, towering mountain ash to forestry plantations.  If you ride down Grand Ridge Road you will feel like you’ve gone back in time  This road was built in a by-gone era.

GRR takes you past the Mount Worth State Park.  And into Mirboo North, which has colourful murals depicting the history of the town.  Adorning the sides of local shops which are great to get a photo with your bike next to. If you enjoy a Beer, then Mirboo North also has the Grand Ridge Brewery.  You drop in and sample some of Gippsland’s finest Beers and Ales.  The final part of your journey will take you through the magnificent Tarra Bulga National park.  This is one of Victoria’s most spectacular cool temperate rain forests.

 

You will rarely have the opportunity to ride such a beautiful road that offers stunning views throughout.  You’ll find it just a delight to ride, and will offer you a adventure of a lifetime.  Whether you ride a short section.  Or take on the whole 135km you will be left with lasting memories.

Cycling Grand Ridge Road

Start:                                Seaview

Finish:                             Carrajung

Public Transport:          V-Line Services run alongside the Princess Highway.  Check out the PT Website for further details

As with all unsealed roads, the road surface can change depending on weather conditions.  Take appropriate equipment, and some extra spares and make sure you take lots of photos along the way.

Noojee Trestle Bridge Rail Trail

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Location: Noojee
Distance: 6km return
Surface: Generally smooth dirt or gravel track
Start: Old Station in Noojee Village (opposite School Road)
Finish: Noojee Trestle Bridge

Noojee Trestle Bridge

Take a journey down a short scenic cycling trail that climbs gently for three kilometers.  This is a smooth gravel track, which takes you among the beautiful tall Eucalpt & Fern forest. If you’re in the area its worth making the short detour.   Stretch your legs and enjoy the peaceful surrounds.  Take the opportunity to ride across the areas most iconic attraction.

 

You’ll want to ride across the Noojee Trestle Bridge. Its an amazing experience.  This bridge is the tallest surviving wooden trestle bridge in Victoria. It was originally constructed in 1919, but in 1939 was burnt down and rebuilt in the same year. It is an impressive structure spanning 102 meters, is 21 meters high and is supported by 19 sets of piles. The Trestle bridge was one of seven trestle bridges found on a rail line that linked Flinders Street Station to the small country town of Noojee, which closed down in 1954.

The Buln Buln Shire Council purchased the No. 7 Noojee trestle bridge from Victorian Railways for the nominal sum of £1 ($2).  Not a bad little buy.

Noojee is 129km east of Melbourne and is a long drive.  If you’re out this way to climb Mount Baw Baw then consider making the short detour.  Its an amazing ride.

Noojee Trestle Bridge Rail Trail

Tourism

The Baw Baw region is one of the best in Victoria to visit by bike.  You’ll find the area steeped in history. Originally settled by gold prospectors during the 1860’s.  The area became a timber industry which helped to sustain the area through the following century.

A short journey from Noojee is the Toorongo Falls Road.  This follows the river into a scenic valley which reaches the Toorono Falls Reserve. There is a short 750 metre walk through the tall wet forest to reach the Toorongo Falls which is a must do if you’re visiting the area.

Warragul to Noojee Train line

The Trestle bridge was once part of the Warragul to Noojee train line.  Which opened in sections with Warragul to Rokeby on 12 May 1890.  And then Rokeby to Neerim South on 18 March 1892.  This rail line was built to service the timber industry in the upper Latrobe River area.  The railway transported timber as well as providing a general goods and passenger service to towns in the area.  Much of the line traversed dense Eucalyptus forests, and the line and the towns it served were at high risk of bush fire damage.

In February 1926.  The town of Noojee and much of the line from Nayook was destroyed in the Black Sunday bush fires. The line was closed for repairs until 17 May 1926.  The town was again razed by fire in the Black Friday bush fires of Friday 13 January 1939.  Along with three of the large trestle bridges on the railway line between Nayook and Noojee.

The line was closed for a number of reasons:
  • Construction of roads in and around the area made the need for the railway redundant
  • The line was running at a loss
  • Expensive repairs over the years due to bushfire damages

The line was closed beyond Nayook on 27 March 1954.

How to get there

Noojee is located in Gippsland, approximately 128 km east of Melbourne.  You can choose to either drive there via the Yarra Valley, heading south from Yarra Junction or north from Warragul.

During fire season

Noojee is in a fire district. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at www.cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.

Vespers Hill

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Distance: 4.4km
Average Gradient: 7.4%
Maximum Gradient: 14%
Elevation gain: 332 metres
Category: 3
Traffic: Light traffic
Terrain: State Forest
Road Surface: Sealed (average)

Here is a link to the Strava segment here:

In the shadow of Mount Baw Baw lies a climb named Vespers Hill.  Those looking to ride through to Baw Baw need to first contend with Vespers and it is no easy feat.  Relentlessly long steep gradients and a rough gritty surface make this one very tough climb.  This is a climb which is a popular inclusion in the Baw Baw classic.  This is held annually by the Warrigul Cycling Club.

Vespers Hill climb

The climb starts several kilometers east of Noojee just after you pass the bridge crossing the Toorongo River.  Approximately 50 km from Mount Baw Baw.  The climb up Vespers Hill takes you through some stunning state forests.

The Vespers climb offers consistently steep gradients with the hardest part of the climb being around the middle. The climb takes you through stunning state forest and rugged rock peaks and you make your way up windy bends.

This is one of those climbs which seems to go on forever and you’ll be relieved when you get over the top.

Vespers Hill at a glance

  • Long windy road with deceptive gradient changes
  • Thick forest to either side of the road
  • Quiet roads.  Majority of traffic would be tourist traffic
  • Super fast descent on the far side (please use caution)
  • Closest food stop is in Noojee

History

The Baw Baw region is one of the best in Victoria to visit by bike, and is steeped in history. Originally settled by gold prospectors during the 1860’s, the area became a timer industry.  This industry helped to sustain the area through the following century.

Shortly into the climb on the left hand side of the road is Tooronog Valley Road. If you ever get a chance to head down this road to visiti the Toorongo Falls it’s an amazing walk.  From the car park you travel through a scenic valley.  There is a short 750 metre walk through the tall wet forest to reach the Toorongo Falls.

Image courtesy of Flickr “Rexness”

If you’re attempting Vespers then we would recommend that you visit the historic trestle bridge in Noojee.  This is Victoria’s oldest trestle bridge which was built in 1919 as part of a railway to transport timber out of the area. There is a 6 km rail trail from Noojee which is amazing to ride.

Noojee Trestle bridge

The Baw Baw Classic

Vespers Hill is integral to the Baw Baw classic which is an event which has been run by the Warragul Cycling Club since 2001and through the success of this event has also been used in several editions of the Jayco Herald Sun Tour.

Pro rider & SBS commentator Dave McKenzie won the inaugural event and commented that the climb was equal to the hard ones in Europe. These comments and the race conditions went a long way to establishing the race as a tough nut of a ride.  The race has also been won by a number of other famous riders including Simon Gerrans, Simon Clarke, Matt Clarke & a 3 time winner Nathan Earle.

How to get there

This climb is located approximately 110 km east of Melbourne on the Mt Baw Baw tourist road.  The climb begins just after you pass the bridge crossing the Toorongo River.

During fire season

The Baw Baw National Park is in a fire district. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at http://www.cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.

Mount Erica

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Distance: 14.3 km
Average Gradient: 5%
Maximum Gradient: 24.2%
Elevation gain: 703 metres
Category: HC
Traffic: Tourist traffic only
Terrain: Forest
Road Surface: Part sealed/part 4WD track

Here is a link to the Strava segment here:

Mount Erica is part of the Baw Baw National Park in Gippsland.  Situated approximately 120 kilometres east of Melbourne and is renowned for its hikes up to the Baw Baw plateau.

Mount Erica climb

The first 10 km from Erica to the Mount Erica turnoff is a real pleasure to ride you climb.  Moe-Wallhalla Road offers some great rolling hills.  With stunning scenery along the way to the base of Mount Erica.  The average gradient of this climb is very deceptive.  There are several descents along the way really bring down the average gradient of this climb.

After 10 km of undulating climbing you will see the sign for Mount Erica.  The turnoff is incredibly steep, averaging over 20%.  This climb starts tough and doesn’t relent all the way to the top. Mount Erica Road is a 4WD track and is a fraction wider than a 4WD so keep an eye out for vehicles.  The road is not maintained well & would recommend to do this one on a CX or MTB.

Ouch

The road is canopied by a tall majestic forest which shuts out the light, but has consequences. The road is more likely to experience storm damage & the road is more likely to hold moisture.  There is likely to be debris from trees falling onto the road.  Which when you’re climbing on gradients well in excess of 10% and are forced to dodge or bunny hop over objects makes for one extreme climb that you’ll be proud to make it to the top.  This road averages 11% over 4.3 km’s & is relentless.  The gradient never dips below 10% and with the road in bad shape this one is hell to get up.

The first pinch

Mount Erica at a glance

  • The first 10 km are undulating offering some great views of Mount Baw Baw
  • Quiet country roads
  • Great scenery
  • General store/Cafe situated at the start of the climb in Erica
  • The climb up to Mount Erica is gravel and incredibly steep
  • Please use extreme caution on the descent

How to get there

The climb begins in Erica which is located approximately 167 km east of Melbourne.  To get to Erica, take the M1 Freeway, and exit at Moe, and head north-east up Moe-Rawson Road.

During fire season

The Baw Baw National Park is in a fire district. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at http://www.cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.

Strzelecki Ranges

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Strzelecki Ranges via  Korrumburra-Warragul Road

The Strzelecki Ranges, are part of the Great Dividing Range, and extend for over 100 km between the Latrobe Valley and Bass Strait.  The Ranges generally rise between 300 – 500 metres in height with the highest peak at Mount Tassie which rises to 730 metres.

The ride down Warragul-Korrumburra Road is one of the best ways to experience the Strzelecki Ranges on a sealed road by bike.  This 39.1km section of road offers some challenging undulating roads through rolling farmland and offers some of the areas best views.  Although there are no big climbs along the way, there is a fair amount of climbing either way.

Image by Robyn Cox; Flickr

Details

Link to Warragul to Korumburra segment here:

Elevation gained:   820 metres

Link to Korumburra to Warragul segment here:

Elevation gained:  710 metres

The Ranges are named after Count Pawel Edmund Strzelecki who was a Polish explorer. After climbing and naming Mount Kosciusko, his party journeyed to Gippsland.  Entering the north-eastern end of the Strzelecki Ranges and struggled through the rugged country for 22 days.  Finally emerging starved and exhausted at Western Port Bay in the 1840s.

Before the Ranges were settled, they were covered in dense forest.  The area had some magnificent tall Mountain Ash and temperate Rainforest. Sadly in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, much of the Rainforest was cleared for agriculture and logging.  With regrowth, the Range still remains a beautiful area to visit.

Grand Ridge Road

The road leading to Grand Ridge Road turns off Warragul-Korrumburra Road.  Much of Grand Ridge Road is unsealed and is arguably the best way to experience the Strzelecki Ranges by bike.  Grand Ridge Road is 135 km in length and extends from near the village of Strzelecki and follows the ridge line through the western side of Mount Worth State Park, Mirboo North & Ballok & ending at Carrajung in the east.

Image by Andrew Clifforth

Korrumburra-Warragul Road at a glance

  • Incredible views of the rolling countryside
  • Very undulating roads
  • Narrow shoulder
  • Lots of sweeping bends
  • Several sections are exposed to the elements and you will get buffeted around on a windy day
  • Food and toilets available at Korumburra & Warragul

How to get there

Warragul is approximately 106 km south-east of Melbourne and accessable via the M1 Freeway.  There is a V-Line service to Warragul.  Click here for timetables.

Yarragon South Road (Yarragon)

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Distance: 4.9 km
Average Gradient: 5%
Elevation gain: 270 meters
Traffic: Light traffic
Surface: Gravel
Category:
3

Here is a link to the Strava segment here:

Image courtesy of Andrew (around_oz); courtesy of Flickr

This climb takes you out from the township of Yarragon and across the foothills of the Strzelecki Ranges.  The area is renowned for its stunning rolling green hills.  The Strzelecki Ranges rises to over 500 metres in height from the south of the town.  This provides a spectacular backdrop to the start of this climb.  This climb is one for the gravel grinders.  And for those that enjoy a sense of adventure and don’t mind a challenge.  The road surface is fairly good with a little bit of loose gravel on the road.  Thankfully it is fairly easy to pick a riding line.

The climb has numerous switchbacks and the thing which you will most remember about this climb are the views.  The higher you climb the more stunning they become.  Offering panoramic views of the Mount Baw Baw National Park.

This is an amazing part of Gippsland to visit.  Offering some of Victoria’s greatest network of gravel roads, and has some incredible climbing.

History

Yarragon was originally called Waterloo however as there was another town of the same name.  This caused confusion with the mail and the town changed names in 1883.  Yarragon is short for Yarragondock, which is an Aboriginal word meaning “mustachoes”,  Don’t be surprised if you see a few of them come “Movember”.  The town was a centre for dairy farms, and had a big logging industry, heavily logging the forested hills to the south.

The Strzelecki Ranges off some of Victoria’s best kept secrets and is a playground for the climbers and adventure seekers alike.  The Strzelecki Ranges can be explored from any of the towns at the base of the Strzelecki’s off the Princess Highway such as Warrigul, Trafalgar & Taralgon.

Yarragon South Road is used in Audax Victoria’s Gippsland Gold event and is one of the premiere climbs in the event.

Vespers East

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Distance: 1.6km
Average Gradient: 7.7%
Maximum Gradient: 11.6%
Category: 4
Elevation gain: 123 metres
Traffic: Light traffic
Terrain: Forest
Road Surface: Good

Here is a link to the Strava segment here:

Vespers Hill takes you through the heartland of the  Baw Baw National Park.  The area is rich in history and offers some stunning scenery and is a great place to ride.  The climb up the rear side of Vespers Hill is short, sharp and brutal.  Located approximately 40km west of the Mount Baw Baw Alpine village.  Scary to say that this is the easier side of Vespers to climb as its a real lung burner.

The climb begins shortly after the intersection of Willow Grove Road & the Mount Baw Baw Tourist Road.

Start of the climb

Vespers East is steep right from the start.  The majority of this climb averages around 10% in gradient and the climb has long sweeping bends and the climb can seem a major grind.  You’ll want to find a good tempo to sit on if you don’t feel like cooking yourself.

The road is surrounded by state forest, with a thick foliage which will shade the road, and is a good climb to do on a hot day.   The climb finishes near Vesper Road.

This is one of those evil climbs that throws a final f#$k you.

Over the top of Vespers East is a very short descent.  In front of you is a short sharp nasty pinch well  in excess of 10% that will help to finish off your legs.

Mount St Gwinear (Erica)

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Distance: 26.1 km
Average Gradient: 3%

Maximum Gradient: 15%
Elevation gain:  1,200 meters
Traffic:Light traffic
Surface: Sealed/Gravel
Category: HC

Here is a link to the Strava segment here:
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Mout St Gwinear (Erica) climb

Mount St Gwinear is best known for its cross country Skiing.  Sitting at an altitude of 1,509 metres above sea level. It is located to the South West of the Mount Baw Baw Village.  Being one of the state’s best hidden Mountain climbs in Victoria
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The climb starts in front of the Erica General store
Don’t be fooled by the average gradient as this is a very difficult climb. It can be hard to get into a rhythm due to constant undulation changes.  However the scenery, and free flowing windy roads make this climb a joy to do.
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The first half of this climb is on windy undulating roads. After you pass the Rawson turnoff the road becomes Thompson Valley Road. You’ll pass South Face Road to the left side of the road.  This is a gravel road which would take you up to Mount Baw Baw if you were feeling adventurous. With 30 km of gravel & close to 1,100 metres of climbing this is one of Australia’s toughest climbs.
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Shortly after you pass South Face Road, you’ll see a turn off to Mount Erica.  The 20% pinch on the corner will give you an indication of what you’d be in for if you braved it up that 4 km climb. After 13.2 km’s of climbing you’ll come to a dirt road on your left hand side where you will need to turn off.

Yyou will see a big sign “Declared Hazardous Area” which is not very comforting.

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Mount St Gwinear is a gem of a climb and suitable for Road bikes. The first 8 km’s of climbing has a fairly consistent gradient.  The road is quite wide and there is plenty of space for cars to pass, however large logging trucks can populate this road.  If you do hear one coming it can pay to get out of their way, as they can drive quite recklessly.
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After climbing for 8 km’s you will come to a turnoff for Mount St Gwinear.  This is where you will earn your money.
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With 21 km’s of climbing in the legs the last thing you want is to be hit by a consistent 10% gradient for the next 3.5 km’s.  The road surface deteriorates as well & there is a lot more gravel on the road.  Unfortunately/fortunately the climb has a nasty end to it.
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You will come to a steep descent which of around 300 metres. You’re legs will breath a sigh of relief momentarily until you see what in store for the remainder of the climb.  The last km does not drop below 10% and peaks at 15%.

Expect to see snow throughout the winter months going through to Spring.

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As for any dirt climb, the condition of the road varies depending on weather conditions. The first 5 km’s are very steep and caution is advised. Also be careful of Logging Trucks, as they can travel at very excessive speeds.

The Baw Baw shire is in a fire district. Anyone entering parks and forests during the bushfire season needs to stay aware of forecast weather conditions. Check the Fire Danger Rating and for days of Total Fire Ban at www.cfa.vic.gov.au or call the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.

How to get there

The climb begins in Erica which is located approximately 167 km east of Melbourne.  To get to Erica, take the M1 Freeway, and exit at Moe, and head north-east up Moe-Rawson Road.